Why does a node in a standing wave have zero displacement?

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Lupe Wiza asked a question: Why does a node in a standing wave have zero displacement?
Asked By: Lupe Wiza
Date created: Tue, Jul 20, 2021 3:11 PM
Date updated: Wed, Jun 29, 2022 1:41 PM

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Video answer: Standing waves on strings | physics | khan academy

Standing waves on strings | physics | khan academy

Top best answers to the question «Why does a node in a standing wave have zero displacement»

The nodes are points of no displacement caused by the destructive interference of the two waves. The antinodes result from the constructive interference of the two waves and thus undergo maximum displacement from the rest position.

  • At a node, there is complete destructive interference at all times, so the displacement is zero. Why does a node in a standing wave have zero displacement? As the siren moves away, each wave front produced by the siren is farther from the previous wave front than if the siren were standing still.

Video answer: Standing waves

Standing waves

1 other answer

a node results from the superposition of two waves going in the opposite directions. Where the node is, the two waves cancel each other out.

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